Exposure Composure

In the community where I live, there has surprisingly been a huge controversy over students reading Nickel and Dimed in their high school English class. The conservative parents leading this initiative feel that it is teaching students how to cheat on drug tests, that it is anti-Christian, and that it promotes a progressive political agenda.

For my seventh grade Sunday School class, I was given an assignment to write a book report about Mein Kamph. I borrowed the book from my synagogue’s library. While I found the book repulsive and terrifying, it was important for me to have the opportunity to confront and attempt to understand all of history.

I feel very grateful that I was nurtured by adults at my synagogue, many of whom were politically conservative, who believed that I and other children had the capacity to understand complex topics and to distinguish between right and wrong. Being exposed to the full human experience helps us to better understand who we are and our place in the world both individually and as part of a community.

Balancing Continuity and Creativity

Continuity connects us to our past. It makes us feel secure and grounded. It adds an element of familiarity and predictability to life which is reassuring.

Creativity is our future. It is the unknown emergent possibility. It is surprising, fun, and exciting.

The present is the fulcrum that balances continuity and creativity, balancing the weight of each.

We experience continuity and creativity in our lives both separately and simultaneously. They both support and oppose each other. The new cannot be understood without the context of the old. The old holds spaces for the new to materialize through disintegration or disconnection.